Home » LAW » lyles, pp. 423-428

lyles, pp. 423-428

Louisville Jail Humiliates Black Woman By Bringing Her To Court Without Pants On


1 Comment

  1. Deleted userNov 30, 2016
    Allowing these government institutions to function without transparency and accountability is the reason things like this happen. If things happen in secret, then it is alright. Prisons and jails should stop functioning as if they are the very far edge of democracy, and we need to start holding them accountable and demanding they become more transparent.
    Reply
    Deleted user
    Deleted userNov 29, 2016
    Prisons are meant to reform individuals. Reformation cannot be achieved if prisoners are being treated as less than human. However, there are plenty of instances in which prison actually helped people, so there are not only horrific stories of mistreated prisoners. It is our responsibility as citizens and human beings to stand up for those with no rights who are exploited, and that includes prisoners.
    Reply
    Deleted user
    Deleted userDec 1, 2015
    In my Law and Society class we discussed the fact that only 2% of the defendants use the NGRI defense(not guilty for insanity reasons) because prisoners have way more rights than people in mental institutions do. Inmates have the right to be free from sexual harassment, to complain about prison conditions, to have medical care, to join self development programs( education, crafts), to be free from racial segregation etc..
    Reply
    Comments above copied from original document
    Deleted user
    Deleted userNov 30, 2015
    “Jails and prisons are designed to break human beings, to convert the population into specimens in a zoo – obedient to our keepers, but dangerous to each other.” – Angela Davis
    Reply
    Comments above copied from original document
    Deleted user
    Deleted userNov 30, 2015
    This section reminded me of a documentary I watched (somewhere on Netflix if anyone is interested) about solitary confinement. It essentially held the viewpoint that solitary confinement by nature is cruel and unusual punishment that should be abolished and that it is an infringement on prisoner’s rights.
    I believe the biggest issues regarding prisoners rights as of right now are indeed solitary confinement and the rights of prisoners accused of terror crimes. The later has become increasingly important with the rise of ISIS and the influx of violence into society….
    It is valid to ask just how absolute rights are once one becomes a prisoner….especially when the death of so many innocent people is on the line. If “students do not shed their constitutional rights at the schoolhouse doors”, do prisoners shed their constitutional rights at the prison gates? Are these two even comparable? Perhaps.
    Yes, prisoners are people too, and people have rights. I agree that in noviolent offense cases where rights are strippped there is a major issuue, and i believe that there is a massive dehuminization of prisoners that has occurred. I simply aim to highlight the question of where the line currently is, and where it ought to be

    I also agree with Justice Rehnquist on his believe that the courts should not involve themselves in prison policy until it becomes a constitutional question
    Reply
    Comments above copied from original document
    Deleted user
    Deleted userNov 30, 2015
    I think that society has demonized and dehumanized prisoners so much that it’s easy to agree with limitations on prisoners ‘ rights. I am not saying that prison should be a vacation but I can’t help but think of the percentage of people, many that are in prison for nonviolent offenses or that are wrongly convicted, that not only lose many rights as citizens, but are also treated in inhumane ways. A prison sentence should not mean that a person should lose constitutional protection.
    Reply
    Comments above copied from original document
    Deleted user
    Deleted userNov 30, 2015
    As a first, I actually agree with Justice Rehnquist on prisoner’s rights. He states that “courts out to refrain from becoming enmeshed in the minutiae of prison operations”. This I agree with. The Rehnquist Court seemed to put harsher limitations on prisoner’s rights. Things being said such as “the Constitution requires the maintenance of human conditions but not comfort” and “the conditions themselves are part of the punishment” fall into line on my views of prisoner’s rights. I believe that prisoner’s give up most of their constitutional rights when they become imprisoned.
    Reply
    Comments above copied from original document
    Kevin Lyles
    Kevin Lyles
    lets talk about this.
    Jul 31, 2016•Edit•Delete
    Kevin Lyles
    Deleted user
    Deleted userNov 30, 2015
    The Supreme Court has not come to a definite list of what is considered prisoner’s rights. Through each court case, they change their minds or add to the rights that a prisoner might have. Such in Hutto v. Finney where the conditions in which the inmate served his solitary confinement, were inhuman and revolting. Thus, with each case it is necessary to examine the extent in which prisoners have rights
    Reply
    Comments above copied from original document
    Marisol Campos
    Marisol CamposNov 30, 2015
    I’m not sure there is an absolute outline of prisoner rights. I feel this way because laws change. Also, sentences evidently vary by person. For example, people of higher status such as celebrities would serve a small period of time or have the alternative of community service or home arrest. Many argue that it is due to hiring good lawyers, however I feel there is more to it than “good lawyers”. With this in mind, it is hard to imagine that there is equal justice across the board.
    Reply
    Comments above copied from original document
    Deleted user
    Deleted userDec 1, 2014
    The constitutional rights of prisoners regarding the rights of persons acused of crimes, such as habeas corpus, should not be limited by state or other statute. With regard to the conditions of imprisonment, there needs to be standards to protect an individual’s health and safety. Other than that, unfavorable conditions need not necessarily be constitutionally protected. -L. Trujillo
    Reply
    Comments above copied from original document
    Deleted user
    Deleted userDec 1, 2014
    From the reading I found it interesting that the accused are not entitled to the application of the Griffin rule which means that a prosecutor cannot imply guilt if you choose to remain silent. Also, it’s interesting that prisoner’s do not have a right to a union, although not surprising. I guess it would be bad for inmates to have solidarity.
    GB
    Reply
    Comments above copied from original document

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.

The maximum upload file size: 250 MB. You can upload: image, audio, video, document, spreadsheet, interactive, text, archive, code, other. Links to YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and other services inserted in the comment text will be automatically embedded. Drop file here

css.php